Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Art: Flag on cheesecloth

 

DSCF1471

 

I wanted to share this interesting technique with you. The overall affect is quite pleasing to the eye in my opinion.  It is a perfect setting for our a tattered American flag.

All you need is….

1.  Paint sticks (or some sort of flat surface to attach your cheesecloth to).

2.  Cheesecloth (enough to cover the surface and wrap around the back).

3.  Sewing hoop 

4.  Gesso

5.  Acrylic paint

6.  Mod Podge (or your favorite glue sealer)

7.  Frame (I used painted stretcher strips)

As I was working on this picture I was thinking about the blood that has continually been shed in the name of “freedom” throughout our history.  You can begin reading of the blood shed for freedom in God’s Word.  The ultimate blood shed was Christ on the cross.  This blood shed freed us from laws we could not keep.  No matter how hard we try, we are humans, not perfect like God, so we will always fail.  But God made a way for us to be free.  His Son Jesus Christ shed His blood on the cross for us. 

Throughout history men have shed blood for the right to be free, to live and worship as they believed.  That is what the flag represents to me, freedom.

Try your hand at duplicating this project, all you have to do is……………………

1.  Place your cheesecloth in the sewing hoop, pull gently to tighten, close the sewing hoop.

2.  Apply the gesso to the area where you are going to paint on, thicker specifically in the focal point area.

3.  Once dry, (I let mine set for several days), use a watery acrylic to paint your design.

4.  When dry, gently remove the cheesecloth from the sewing hoop and lay on the flat surface of your choosing.  Position it where you would like it to be and seal with the decopauge technique.  You’ll have to use gently strokes on the parts of the cloth there is not much gesso on.

5.  Once your sealer is, dry frame it and your done.

If you try painting something else besides a flag, I’d like to see what you come up with.  Here’s the picture after it was framed.

 

DSCF1471 (2)